Sudanspezifische Forschungsprojekte

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30.04.2022
Advising on African and Global Studies: Evaluation Activities, Teaching Projects, Publications, Lectures, and Co-operations

In recent months, Professor Karl Wohlmuth was busy in various directions. He did various evaluations of research proposals for the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, specifically for the Georg Forster Research Fellowship Programmes for Experienced Researchers and for the Visiting Research Fellowship Programme of the Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge, UK, beside of routine evaluations of incoming articles and research proposals. As he was himself a scientific supervisor of Alexander von Humboldt/Georg Forster senior research fellows, he knows the character of these very competitive applications quite well.

Professor Karl Wohlmuth was also involved as an expert in a quite interesting teaching project. His duty was it to give his expert opinion on Kenya in the year 2045. It was the task to review the current situation of Kenya and to give a prognosis about the major trends for  Kenya up to the year 2045. It was interesting to learn from the task that Kenya is preparing not only for the digital age but also for managing the impacts of the climate crisis and the long-term effects of COVID-19. All this is done by reviewing and adapting the constitution and the planning procedures of Kenya, the local development and decentralization approaches for the counties in Kenya, and the whole institutional infrastructure of the country so that a knowledge society and a participatory society can emerge in Kenya.

A highlight of the work was the release of volume 22 of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook for the years 2020/2021 on the theme ”Sustainable Development Goal Nine - Challenges and Opportunities”. This Open Access Publication was received with great expectations and huge interest by policymakers in Africa, as it is one of the few publications for giving concrete examples how SDG 9 (on industry, innovation, and infrastructure) can be promoted in Africa. The recommendations worked out from the authors of the Festschrift “30 Years Anniversary of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook (1989 – 2019)” were already taken up and considered in the new issue. Also, the Research Group on African Development Perspectives Bremen did now mostly finalize volume 23 (for 2022/2023) of the Yearbook with the theme “Business Opportunities, Start-ups and Digital Transformation in Africa”. It was a good opportunity to share experiences with so many guest editors, authors, reviewers, and other contributors. The volume is composed of four Units (Parts) and gives new insights on digital transformation, digital entrepreneurship, and new business opportunities arising in this context. There is also a strong Unit with Book Reviews and Book Notes on publications along the theme. The volume is based on country cases and on analytical surveys. The Editorial Committee for the Yearbook has already decided about the focus of volume 24 (for 2024). The title will be: “Fiscal Capacity and Resource Mobilization in Africa - New Strategies and New Instruments”. Covid-19 and the need of financing for mitigating and adapting to the climate crisis have revealed the importance of new strategies for domestic resource mobilization in Africa and of getting to new long-term global financing mechanisms for Africa’s restructuring and development processes.

On Sudan Studies, Professor Karl Wohlmuth has published two essays to highlight for an international Handbook on Near and Middle East Studies the country cases of “Sudan” and “South Sudan”. It was done in an interdisciplinary manner, covering culture, geography, history, economy, and politics of the two countries. There was also an intensified co-operation with Professor Samia Nour, University of Khartoum, Sudan on “COVID-19 and impacts on households and firms in Sudan” and on the “End of the <Sudanese Revolution> on 25 October 2021 after breaking with the regime of Al-Bashir in April 2019 after 30 years”. Professor Wohlmuth did prepare a note for the international press about the event.

New publications were done on the theme of “Comparing Waste Management Policies of Nigeria and Germany – What can the two countries learn from each other”  (written together with Professor Reuben A. Alabi from Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria). A deep analysis resulted which found interest in both countries. The authors have followed for the two countries the same system of classification for the waste management actions and policies which were discussed. Also, a blog was written about the Aggression War by Russia on the Ukraine and what this means for future academic cooperation (together with Professor Axel Sell). The Faculty of Economics and Business Studies of the University of Bremen and IWIM (Institute for World Economics and International Management) had and still has impressive co-operations with universities in the Ukraine.

Professor Wohlmuth did lecture at a conference in Bremen by Development NGOs about “Lessons from the Corona and the Economic Crisis for the African Continent”. The presentation did outline the major twelve (12) lessons which should be considered by policymakers and donors, and definitely also by the community of development researchers. The conference did compare country cases of Africa with country cases of Latin America, but considered also more general issues of the global health crisis and the health crisis in the Global South. A blog was written on the twelve (12) lessons for Africa by Professor Karl Wohlmuth on these issues (in German).

Professor Wohlmuth did participate at numerous other Zoom scientific conferences and launches of new publications. Launches of new studies, presentations of new OECD studies, and workshops on current political, developmental and economic issues show the advantages of virtual meetings. This format may be a good addition to other forms of meetings and presentations (also for Post-COVID times).

At the occasion of the celebration of the “Anniversary after 50 Years of the University of Bremen (1971 - 2021)” Professor Wohlmuth has also contributed to the Festschrift prepared by the Faculty of Economics and Business Studies of the University of Bremen. He was one of the first professors appointed in 1971 for the research and teaching field of “Comparative Economic Systems”. There was a huge programme placed for the year 2021 to celebrate the anniversary in the City of Bremen and at the Campus. The University of Bremen started in 1971 with various interesting and highly important experiments (interdisciplinary research and teaching, orientation towards practical application of theoretical reasoning, fair participation of all stakeholders at the university, strong focus on Third World issues, teaching the understanding of the evolution of the current socio-economic system in all faculties, and new forms of organizing the university through collective and participatory meetings and decision-making).

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30.04.2022
Lehren aus der Corona- und Wirtschaftskrise für die nachhaltige Entwicklung in Afrika – Eine wichtige entwicklungspolitische Tagung fand in Bremen statt

Das Bremer entwicklungspolitische Netzwerk e. V. (BeN) veranstaltete in Kooperation mit dem Afrika Netzwerk Bremen (ANB) und dem Bremer Informationszentrum für Menschenrechte und Entwicklung (biz) am 1. Dezember 2021 eine Tagung zum Thema “Lehren aus der Corona- und Wirtschaftskrise für die nachhaltige Entwicklung im Globalen Süden“. Das Programm (vgl.: PDF Tagung Lehren aus der Corona-Pandemie) beinhaltete Vorträge zu den Auswirkungen der Pandemie auf die Erreichung der Nachhaltigkeitsziele und zum Zustand der Globalen Gesundheitspolitik, aber auch Vorträge zu den Auswirkungen auf und Lektionen für den lateinamerikanischen Kontinent und für den afrikanischen Kontinent. Der Bremer Entwicklungsökonom Professor Karl Wohlmuth referierte über die „Lektionen aus der Corona- und Wirtschaftskrise für den afrikanischen Kontinent“. In drei Arbeitsgruppen wurden dann spezifische Themen der Krise diskutiert. Dann folgte eine Podiumsdiskussion mit dem Thema, wie die deutsche Entwicklungspolitik in dieser Zeit wirksamer gestaltet werden kann (vgl. zu der Online-Tagung auch: https://ben-bremen.de/news/lehren-aus-der-corona-und-wirtschaftskrise-fuer-die-nachhaltige-entwicklung-im-globalen-sueden/). In Bremen gibt es viele Vereine und Initiativen, die sich bei der Corona-Soforthilfe engagieren (vgl. dazu den Bericht: https://ben-bremen.de/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/FINAL_Corona-Soforthilfe-Bericht-extra-klein.pdf).

Der Bremer Professor Karl Wohlmuth ging in seiner Präsentation auf zwölf Lehren ein, die sich für Afrika abzeichnen (vgl. die Langfassung der Präsentation - Wohlmuth-Corona-Lehren Afrika-10-2021 - und die Kurzfassung der Präsentation – Kurzversion-Wohlmuth-Corona-Lehren Afrika-11-2021). Die zwölf Lehren für Afrika bedeuten, dass die globale und die regionale Gesundheits- und  Wirtschaftspolitik dringend umgestellt werden müssen, dass nationale und regionale Strategien  der Entwicklung des Gesundheitssektors in Afrika höhere Priorität haben müssen und viel besser koordiniert werden müssen, dass die pharmazeutische Industrie und die Industrie für medizinische Hilfsmittel und Ausrüstungen in Afrika regional gefördert werden müssen und sich aus diversen Abhängigkeiten von OECD-Ländern und Schwellenländern wie China und Indien befreien müssen, dass die personelle Ausstattung der lokalen Gesundheitsdienste in Afrika verbessert werden müssen und wichtige Akteure näher bei den ländlichen und städtischen Haushalten agieren müssen, und dass schließlich die exzellenten Forschungen in Afrika in den Bereichen Diagnose, Therapie und Impfstoffentwicklung sehr stark intensiviert werden müssen. In einem Blog geht der Bremer Afrikaexperte Karl Wohlmuth auf die zwölf Lehren für Afrika näher ein.

Im Rahmen der Research Group on African Development Perspectives Bremen wird das Thema wissenschaftlich von unseren Kooperationspartnern weiter untersucht, und Ergebnisse der Forschung werden in den Ausgaben des African Development Perspectives Yearbook und in anderen Publikationsreihen des IWIM veröffentlicht. Im Band 23 des African Development Perspectives Yearbook (für 2022/2023), der in Kürze fertiggestellt wird, finden sich relevante Beiträge zu Nigeria und zu Südafrika. Professor Samia Nour von der Khartoum University im Sudan hat wichtige wissenschaftliche Arbeiten zu den ökonomischen Auswirkungen von COVID-19 auf die Haushalte und Unternehmen im Sudan vorgelegt (vgl. dazu: First Draft - The Impact of COVID-19 und Sudan Final Revised Draft - The Impact of COVID-19); sie wird demnächst auch eine Kurzfassung für die SERG Discussion Papers des IWIM verfassen. Die Daten zu den Analysen beziehen sich auf drei Erhebungen. Für die erste und zweite Welle von COVID-19 im Sudan wurde auf den ERF COVID MENA Monitor Survey (April bis August 2021) Bezug genommen; auf Erhebungen für die erste Welle von COVID-19 beruht der World Bank Sudan Households COVID-19 Survey (für 2020). Beide Datengrundlagen und die Auswertung durch Professor Samia Nour ermöglichen es, fein abgestimmte Politikempfehlungen zu geben, die zur Existenzsicherung von Unternehmen und Haushalten beitragen können.

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30.04.2022
Sudan Studies: New Publications on Sudan and South Sudan by Professor Karl Wohlmuth

1 Overview Essays on Sudan and South Sudan/Überblicksaufsätze zum Sudan und zum Südsudan

Professor Karl Wohlmuth has published two essays on Sudan Studies, an overview essay on Sudan and another one on South Sudan. These essays were published in a Handbook Near and Middle East States (see the bibliographic information below). The purpose of the Handbook is it to give a country-wide information on the geography, the history, the culture, the politics, and the economy. Only by such an interdisciplinary approach is it possible to understand current developments and conflict patterns, constellations of ethnic and interest groups, and economic and social perspectives. The editors of the Handbook write in their Foreword about the region: “The present handbook reflects a cultural-geographic understanding of the region that covers North Africa to the southern edge of the Sahara, from Mauritania in the west to Sudan in the east, and also in Asia the entire area from the Arab Peninsula in the south and from Asia Minor in the north over the Iranian highlands to Pakistan.” (Foreword, page 1). Both essays also show the rich history and culture of the Sudan beside of economic and political trends; the Sudan is a country which separated into two independent states (Sudan and South Sudan) in January 9, 2011. As both countries are rich in natural resources, there is a base for a dynamic economic development in both states, if conflicts within the two countries and between the two countries can be solved and avoided.

Inside: New Publications on Sudan and South Sudan

Bibliographic Information.

Bibliographic Information:
Wohlmuth, Karl, 2022, Sudan, pages 323 – 350, in: Handbook Near and Middle East States, Topics: Geography – History – Culture – Politics - Economy, edited by Markus Porsche-Ludwig and Ying-Yu Chen, LIT Asien: Forschung und Wissenschaft/LIT Studies on Asia, Band/Volume 9, ISBN: 978-3-643-91136-0 (pb); ISBN 978-3-643-96136-5 (PDF), LIT Verlag Wien/Zürich 2022; Info: https://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/978-3-643-91136-0

Wohlmuth, Karl, 2022, South Sudan, pages 299 – 321, in: Handbook Near and Middle East States, Topics: Geography – History – Culture – Politics - Economy, edited by Markus Porsche-Ludwig and Ying-Yu Chen, LIT Asien: Forschung und Wissenschaft/LIT Studies on Asia, Band/Volume 9, ISBN: 978-3-643-91136-0 (pb); ISBN 978-3-643-96136-5 (PDF), LIT Verlag Wien/Zürich 2022; Info: https://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/978-3-643-91136-0

2 Das Ende der “Sudanesischen Revolution“: Nach dem Putsch/ The End of the “Sudanese Revolution”: After the Putsch

Professor Karl Wohlmuth hat in einem Vortrag an der Universität Mainz im Januar 2020 und in einer begleitenden Studie die Bürgerbewegung im Sudan analysiert, die im April des Jahres 2019 die 30-jährige Herrschaft von Präsident Al-Bashir beendet hat. Tiefe Skepsis zu den Erfolgsaussichten der „Sudanesischen Revolution“ war der Tenor des Vortrags (vgl. die PDF Wohlmuth-Bürgerbewegung), da es dem gestürzten Präsidenten und seiner Familie, dem Militär und den Milizen in diesen drei Jahrzehnten gelungen war, einen „tiefen Staat“ zu etablieren, also die Wirtschaft, wichtige Unternehmen und viele staatliche Institutionen weitgehend zu kontrollieren und sich in großem Umfang auch Vermögenswerte (Unternehmen, Rechte, natürliche Ressourcen) anzueignen. Die Perspektive einer Zusammenarbeit von Militär/Milizen und zivilen Repräsentanten schien daher wenig aussichtsreich zu sein. Zur Ökonomie der „Sudanesischen Revolution“ wurde von der Kooperationspartnerin des IWIM an der Khartoum University im Sudan, Professor Dr. Samia Nour, eine umfassende Studie publiziert (vgl.): Diskussionsbeiträge der Sudanforschungsgruppe No. 44, Overview of the Sudan Uprising – Before, During and After the Revolution. By: Samia Satti Osman Mohamed Nour, Full Professor of Economics, University of Khartoum, Sudan, June 2020; Link: http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/files/dateien/1833_wohlmuth___layout___serg_44___7__2020_samia_b.pdf.

Am 25. Oktober 2021 kam es zu dem von vielen Experten erwarteten Putsch des Militärs gegen die Regierung des Ministerpräsidenten Abdalla Hamdok, die am 21. August 2019 vom Transition Council eingesetzt worden war. Ministerpräsident Abdalla Hamdok wurde wieder eingesetzt, trat nach wenigen Wochen aber zurück, da die Militärmachthaber ihre Zusagen nicht einhielten. In einem Statement nach dem Putsch im Sudan, das der Presse zugänglich gemacht wurde, hat Professor Karl Wohlmuth die Folgen des Putsches für die Wirtschaft, für die Demokratiebewegung, und für die Konflikte im Land und die weitere Region eingeschätzt (vgl. die PDF Wohlmuth-Sudan-10-2021). Vgl. zu der Presse-Berichterstattung zum Statement von Professor Karl Wohlmuth auch den folgenden Beitrag aus russischer Sicht zum Geschehen im Sudan: https://lenta.ru/news/2021/10/26/ukreplenie/.

In zahlreichen Stellungnahmen wurde der Putsch analysiert, und insbesondere wurde auf die Folgewirkungen für den Sudan und für die angrenzenden Länder eingegangen:

Presseinformationen zum Putsch am 25. 10. 2021:

Frankfurter Allgemeine, 25. 10. 2021: „General erklärt Regierung für aufgelöst“, Link: https://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/ausland/putschversuch-in-sudan-general-erklaert-regierung-fuer-aufgeloest-17601201.html
Tagesspiegel, 25. 10. 2021: „Hafen in Port Sudan blockiert - Putsch mit Ansage“, Link: https://www.tagesspiegel.de/politik/hafen-in-port-sudan-blockiert-putsch-mit-ansage/27736696.html
Tagesschau, 25. 10. 2021: „Erneuter Putsch-Sudanesischer Premier festgesetzt“, Link: https://www.tagesschau.de/ausland/afrika/sudan-putschversuch-107.html

Analytische Beiträge zur “Sudanesischen Revolution” und zum Putsch:
Gunnar M. Sørbø, December 2020, “Sudan’s Transition: Living in Bad Surroundings”, Sudan Working Paper, Number 4, University of Bergen, CMI/Chr. Michelsen Institute, Link: https://www.cmi.no/publications/7395-sudans-transition-living-in-bad-surroundings
Atta El-Battahani, October 2021, “The role of local resistance committees in Sudan’s transitional period”, CMI/Chr. Michelsen Institute, 2021, Link: https://www.cmi.no/publications/7920-the-role-of-local-resistance-committees-in-sudans-transitional-period
African Arguments, Alex De Waal, October 28, 2021, “General al-Burhan: Illegitimate, Unpatriotic, Untrustworthy, and Not a Leader”, Link: https://africanarguments.org/2021/10/general-al-burhan-illegitimate-unpatriotic-untrustworthy-and-not-a-leader/
African Arguments, Various Co-Signatories, October 27, 2021, “We stand with Sudan’s people and demand more AU, IGAD, UN action”, Link: https://africanarguments.org/2021/10/we-stand-with-sudan-people-and-demand-more-au-igad-un-action/
African Arguments, November 25, 2021, “This Is Not a Coup”: Sudan’s Potemkin Agreement, Link: https://africanarguments.org/2021/11/this-is-not-a-coup-sudans-potemkin-agreement/
Gerrit Kurtz/Philipp Jahn, April 14, 2021, “Sudan: What Comes After The Revolution?”, DGAP/Deutsche Gesellschaft für Auswärtige Politik - External Publications, Link: https://gerritkurtz.net/2021/04/10/what-comes-after-the-revolution/
Abrar Mohamed Ali, Opinion, IDS/Institute of Development Studies, 25 February 2022, “Closing online civic space: protest amid internet shutdowns in Sudan”, Link: https://www.ids.ac.uk/opinions/closing-online-civic-space-protest-amid-internet-shutdowns-in-sudan/

On the role of women in the “Sudanese Revolution”: Case studies for the states of Central Darfur, Blue Nile, Kassala, and River Nile/ Über die Rolle der Frauen in der “Sudanesischen Revolution”: Fallstudien zu den Bundesstaaten Central Darfur, Blue Nile, Kassala und River Nile

Azza Ahmed Abdel Aziz and Aroob Alfaki, 2021, “Shifting Terrains of Political Participation in Sudan”, IDEA/Institute for Democracy And Electoral Assistance, Link: https://www.idea.int/sites/default/files/publications/shifting-terrains-of-political-participation-in-sudan.pdf. Bereits jetzt haben sich Status und Rolle der Frauen im Sudan massiv verändert, wenn auch unterschiedlich in verschiedenen States des Sudan. Die politische Partizipation der Frauen ist in einem Transformationsprozess begriffen.

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26.08.2021
Elke Grawert und die Afrikaforschung am IWIM – Ein Nachruf



Elke Grawert, Bremen, 13. November 1958 - 5. März 2021

Frau PD Dr. Elke Grawert ist am Freitag, 5. März 2021 nach schwerer Krankheit gestorben. Der Verlust ist überaus groß – für ihre Söhne, ihre FreundInnen, ihre Kollegen. Das IWIM verdankt ihr viele wichtige Initiativen und Forschungsarbeiten, die zur Reputation dieses universitären Instituts wesentlich beigetragen haben. Sie hat sich in weiten Bereichen der Afrika-, Friedens- und Konfliktforschung betätigt, als Forscherin, als Lehrende, als Beraterin, als Netzwerkerin und als einfühlsame Gesprächspartnerin. Sie hat im klassischen Sinne Feldforschung betrieben und inmitten der Bevölkerung im Sudan, in Tansania und in anderen Ländern des Südens gelebt und gearbeitet. Sie hat die lokale Bevölkerung in ihren Haushalten besucht, bei deren täglicher Arbeit begleitet und beobachtet, Frauen und Männer in entlegenen Dörfern interviewt, und intensive Erhebungen zur Lebensweise und Arbeit von Frauen, deren Männer aus Erwerbsgründen migrierten,  durchgeführt. In vielen Publikationen von Elke Grawert finden sich diese empirischen Erhebungen in methodisch mustergültiger Weise verarbeitet. Zu ihrer letzten beruflichen Station am BICC (Bonn International Center for Conversion)  liegt ein Nachruf vom Direktor des BICC vor. In der Zeit am BICC seit 2010 hat sie sich mit wichtigen Themen der Konflikt- und Friedensforschung befasst. Zu erwähnen sind beispielsweise Arbeiten zur Friedenssicherung in Afghanistan durch konfliktsensitive Beschäftigungsinitiativen und Forschungen zur Verknüpfung von geschäftlichen Interessen des Militärs und der Unternehmen in arabischen Ländern. In ihrer Zeit am BICC hat sie im Juli 2012 an der Universität Bonn die 9th International Sudan Studies Conference ausgerichtet und mehrere hundert Sudanforscherinnen und -forscher aus aller Welt zum wissenschaftlichen Austausch versammelt. Die Tagung wurde ein großer wissenschaftlicher Erfolg.

Vor ihrer Zeit als Senior Research Fellow am BICC war sie in mehreren Funktionen an der Universität Bremen tätig. Sie kooperierte mit dem Forschungsteam von Prof. Dr. Karl Wohlmuth in mehreren Publikations- und Forschungsprojekten zum Sudan und zu anderen afrikanischen Ländern und mit Prof. Dr. Michaela von Freyhold im Rahmen von neu eingerichteten internationalen entwicklungspolitischen Studiengängen. Hier wird über ihre ersten wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten an der  Universität Bremen und über ihre Zeit am IWIM (Institut für Weltwirtschaft und Internationales Management)  berichtet. Sie gehörte zu den Gründern des African Development Perspectives Yearbook, dem englischsprachigen Afrika-Jahrbuch, das an der Universität Bremen seit1989 herausgegeben wird. Bereits am Band 2 (1990/91) war sie beteiligt - mit einer Unit (einem Themenkomplex mit mehreren Aufsätzen) mit dem Titel „Women’s Participation in the Industrialization Process - Problems and Perspectives“. Am Band 3 (1992/93) war sie mit der Unit “Household Energy Systems” beteiligt, und am Band 7 (1999) mit der Unit „Self-Help, Self-Organization, and Empowerment of Disadvantaged Rural and Urban Population Groups“. Am Band 8 (2000/2001) bearbeitete sie die Unit „African Women in the Globalising Economy“. Die Themen, die sie als Mitarbeiterin bzw. als Mitherausgeberin des Afrika-Jahrbuchs besetzte, hatten mit Partizipation von gesellschaftlichen Gruppen, mit der Stärkung der Position und der Lebens- und Arbeitsbedingungen von Frauen, mit der Rolle von Frauen als Unternehmerinnen, und mit der Förderung der Zivilgesellschaft durch lokale Initiativen zu tun. Sie war ein sehr geschätztes Redaktionsmitglied der Herausgebergruppe des Afrika-Jahrbuchs. Mit ihrem schnell anwachsenden wissenschaftlichen Netzwerk war sie sehr hilfreich bei der Themenfindung und -formulierung.

Frau Elke Grawert wurde aufgrund ihrer Sudanforschungsinteressen nach Bremen eingeladen. In der Sudanforschungsgruppe Bremen hat sie viele Jahre aktiv mitgearbeitet, zahlreiche Forschungsvorhaben angestoßen und viele Publikationen erarbeitet. Sie hat auch ihre Dissertation in Bremen angefertigt. Ihre Bücher und Sammelbände konnte sie immer in erstklassigen Verlagen unterbringen. Die Dissertation mit dem Titel “Making A Living In Rural Sudan. Production of Women, Labour Migration of Men, and Policies for Peasants’ Needs”  ist 1998 bei Macmillan Press Ltd erschienen. Sie entwickelte einen Ansatz, in dem sie vier Ebenen integrierte: eine Analyse der ländlichen Entwicklung und der Lebensbedingungen der bäuerlichen Bevölkerung, eine Analyse der Ernährungssicherung, eine Analyse der spezifischen Situation von Frauen in ländlichen Gegenden, und eine Analyse der Migrationsprozesse. Durch moderne Feldforschungsmethoden konnte sie wichtige Ergebnisse erzielen; sie nahm sich immer ausreichend Zeit für ihre Feldforschungsaufenthalte. Für ihre Dissertation etwa war sie von Februar bis September 1988 in Kutum, Nord-Darfur, Sudan, um durch Beobachtung und Interviews Daten für ihre Arbeit zu erheben. Sie lebte dort unter vergleichbaren Bedingungen wie die lokale Bevölkerung, wie die Personen in jenen Haushalten, die sie analysierte. Durch die Beobachtung der Lebens- und Arbeitsbedingungen erarbeitete sie sich ein Verständnis der Struktur der Haushalte und der Arbeitswelt in Kutum, Nord-Darfur; durch Interviews mit Frauen konnte sie deren tägliche Aktivitäten kennenlernen und sich ein Bild von der Gesellschaft und Wirtschaft in Kutum erarbeiten. Ihr Interesse galt vor allem der neuen lokalen Arbeitsteilung und der Arbeitslast der Frauen nach der Erwerbsmigration der Männer. Die präzise Analyse in ihrer Dissertation hat wohl zahlreiche Sudanforscher/Innen angeregt, ihre theoretischen Fragestellungen weiter zu vertiefen.

Aber auch an vielen anderen sudanspezifischen Forschungsarbeiten war Elke Grawert beteiligt. Sie hat etwa ein Forschungsprojekt zur Wanderarbeit im Sahel durchgeführt und 1994 einen wichtigen Band über die Ergebnisse einer  Konferenz zu dem Thema veröffentlicht. Der Band über „Wandern oder bleiben? Veränderungen der Lebenssituation von Frauen im Sahel durch die Arbeitsmigration der Männer“ war der Versuch, den Analyserahmen von ihrem Dissertationsthema auch für andere Sahelländer zu nutzen. Die Publikation umfasst Fallstudien in acht verschiedenen Orten von vier Sahelländern mit Ergebnissen dazu, wie sich die Arbeits- und Lebensbedingungen von Frauen durch die Migration der Männer verändern. Die Studien zu Orten im Sudan, in Mali, in Burkina Faso und im Senegal zeigen wichtige Muster und Reaktionsweisen auf, was Frauen erleben und wie Frauen in solchen Situationen reagieren. Die Konferenz und die Publikation zeigen auch die Arbeitsweise von Frau Grawert – Frauen berichten über ihre Feldforschungen bei Frauen in afrikanischen Ländern. Unterbelichtete Bereiche der Migrationsforschung wurden sehr konsequent analysiert; das Material wurde handlungsorientiert aufbereitet. Es ging Frau Grawert immer um Wege, wie Frauen ihre Lage vor Ort verbessern können - die Auswirkungen der Arbeitsmigration auf die Ernährungssicherung, auf die geschlechtsspezifische Arbeitsteilung, auf die natürliche Umwelt, und ganz allgemein auf die Handlungsspielräume, die ein Bleiben im Sahel ermöglichen. Auch im Inter-University Centre (IUC) Dubrovnik hat Frau Grawert mehrere Kursprogramme der Universität Bremen bzw. des IWIM unterstützt. Sie nahm gerne die Möglichkeit wahr, als Dozentin bei internationalen Konferenzen über ihre Forschungsergebnisse zu referieren.

Und nun zum Meisterwerk von Elke Grawert. Von größter Bedeutung für die Sudanforschung des IWIM war ihr Engagement für das große Forschungsprojekt „Governance and Social Action in Sudan after the Peace Agreement of January 2005: Local, National, and Regional Dimensions“, das großzügig von der VolkswagenStiftung gefördert wurde. Dieses Forschungsprojekt sollte unmittelbar nach dem Friedensabkommen vom Januar 2005 die Regierungsführung im Sudan durch wissenschaftliche Expertise, durch Ausbildungsprogramme und durch Beratung unterstützen. Die Friedensvereinbarungen zwischen der südsudanesischen Befreiungsfront SPLM und der sudanesischen Regierung in Khartum waren bedeutsam, mussten aber durch internationale solidarische Aktionen unterstützt und stabilisiert werden. Das Projekt startete unmittelbar nach dem Friedensabkommen vom 9. Januar 2005 und endete erst im September 2012 mit der  Übergabe des Endberichtes an die VolkswagenStiftung; immer wieder wurde das Projekt verlängert, auch um die Zeit nach der Unabhängigkeit des Südsudan (9. Januar 2011) noch einzubeziehen. Das Projekt war nicht nur ein Forschungsprojekt, sondern auch ein Ausbildungsprojekt, da auch Masterstudien und Doktoratsstudien im Sudan, in Kenia und in Äthiopien gefördert wurden. Die StudentInnen arbeiteten zu Themen, die mit der Umsetzung des Friedensabkommens im Zusammenhang standen. Die Nachbarländer des Sudan (Kenia und Äthiopien) wurden einbezogen, weil Millionen von sudanesischen Flüchtlingen in Lagern dieser Länder lebten und auf eine geordnete Rückführung in ihre Heimatgebiete hofften. Dieses Projekt hat wichtige Forschungen zum Sudan angeregt, insbesondere hinsichtlich der Chancen für einen Neustart der Beziehungen zwischen dem von der SPLM kontrollierten autonomen und dann unabhängigen Südsudan und der Regierung des Sudan unter Präsident Al-Bashir in Khartum. Das Netzwerk der Bremer Sudanforschung wurde durch das Projekt stark ausgeweitet. Das Projekt war aber auch ein Beratungsprojekt, da Regierungsbehörden im Sudan/Südsudan und UN-Organisationen durchaus an den Ergebnissen der Forschungsarbeit interessiert waren. Frau Grawert hat die Funktion als Projektkoordinatorin akribisch ausgefüllt; die wissenschaftliche und die organisatorische Koordination klappte vorbildlich. Die afrikanischen Wissenschaftler wurden sehr gut in die Projektarbeit integriert, und eine Vielzahl von Publikationen wurde zum Projektthema verfasst. Frau Grawert hat sich intensiv darum bemüht, afrikanischen Nachwuchswissenschaftler/Innen aus den Projektländern Publikationschancen zu bieten.

Wir werden Elke Grawert dankbar in Erinnerung behalten.

Professor Dr. Karl Wohlmuth
IWIM, Fachbereich Wirtschaftswissenschaft,
Universität Bremen

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31.01.2021
“Towards A New Vision For Inclusive Development in Sudan” – First Conference of the Sudan Research Group (SRG) in November 2019 after the Sudanese Revolution in Khartoum



The Sudan Research Group (SRG) has now released its conference report
on the first conference held in Khartoum, Sudan which took place some months after the Sudanese Revolution and the instalment of the Transitional Government. The title of the report is “Towards Sustainable Inclusive Development in Sudan“. The participants were divided into eight clusters to discuss 31 papers around the Conference’s main themes: 1- Macroeconomic Management for Inclusive Development; 2- Bringing the Productive Sectors back in Sudan; 3- Governance and Institutions; 4- Management of Natural Resources; 5- Sustainable Infra-Structure; 6- Social Policy and Public Service Delivery; 7- The Role of the Private Sector; and 8- Gender. The Report was published in 2020 and contains Recommendations on Macroeconomic Issues, Reviving the Productive Sectors, Governance and Institutions, The  Management of Natural Resources, Sustainable Infrastructure, Social Policy and Public Service Delivery, and the Private Sector. There are specific recommendations to the Transitional Government, to the Ministry of Finance and to other competent ministries, to International Donors, and to Civil Society Organizations. The full report contains information about all the clusters of the conference.

The Sudan Research Group (SRG) writes about its mandate: “The Sudan Research Group is a UK-based voluntary organization. It was formed in 2003 by a group of academics and researchers who felt a pressing need for a specialized network that brings together multidisciplinary academics, researchers, activists and policy makers in a forum devoted to in-depth discussions of the key and pressing issues that face the country. Dedicated to impact, it aims to produce and promote research and scholarship that may inform home-grown policies to address the country’s urgent economic, political, and social needs.” And the SRG reports about the conferences: “The main conferences and events organized by the Group so far include “Economic Challenges in Post-conflict Sudan” (2004), “Institutional and Governance Requirements for the Future Development of Sudan” ( 2005 ), “Education and Capacity Building” (2006), “Assessing the Peace-building in Darfur”, (2008), “General Education Crisis in Sudan” (with an Open Themes Group), (2016), Training in Communication for Sudanese NGOs” (2019), and a series of Webinars.” Then, “Towards Sustainable Inclusive Development in Sudan” (2019) was the first conference that SRG was able to convene in Sudan after the Sudanese Revolution which started in December 2018. It was convened for June 2019, but was then postponed to November 2019 (SRG 5TH Meeting Tentative Agenda).

Contact Information about SRG: Email address: Info@Sudanresearchgroup.org; Website: www.sudanresearchgroup.org

About the Report on the SRG Conference November 2019 in Khartoum, Sudan: “The Sudan Research Group (SRG) is pleased to introduce a summary of the proceedings of its Fifth Conference, with the title “Towards Sustainable Inclusive Development in Sudan”. Held only three months after the formation of the Transitional Government that followed the end of three decades of dictatorship, the conference sought to provide a neutral space for open discussions that help in shaping the agenda for change. More than 160 researchers, policy makers, private sector and civil society participants engaged in three days of constructive - and sometimes heated debate - about immediate reform programs and long -term development policies. This report provides a brief summary of the discussions on the key themes of the conference and its substantive findings. It should be noted that the messages and ideas summarized are not intended to indicate a consensus and they do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the SRG”. The report is available for download as a PDF under: Final SRG 5th Conf. 2019. Professor Karl Wohlmuth had the privilege to be invited to the conference as a speaker for the cluster Infrastructure. Professor Wohlmuth follows the studies and projects of the SRG carefully.

Dr. Gamal Al-Tayib from UNECA in Addis Ababa is one of the founders of the SRG.

Another important development about Sudan as two thinktanks are cooperating: SRG is joined by SWEA in development work

In the new Sudan independent NGOs can be founded and have space for action. SWEA (see below) is now ready to mobilise the women economists. There are links between SRG and SWEA. SERG in Bremen is cooperating with these groups.

Sudanese Women Economists Association (SWEA): Empowering the Women in the Peripheries through Capacity Building Projects

Women economists work together for a peaceful and prospering Sudan. Sawsan Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil from the Ministry of Finance in Khartoum, Sudan is a co-founder of the Sudanese Women Economists Association (SWEA). SWEA was founded in June 2020. SWEA is collaborating with the Sudan Research Group (SRG) in a capacity building project. The first (and so far the only) project was an online training on a research proposal writing for the students of Nayala, El Fahser, Gedaref and Kassala, but much more is in the pipeline. Sawsan Musa Adam Abdul-Jalil from the Ministry of Finance in Khartoum, Sudan is working now with the Aid Coordination Unit of the Ministry to restructure their strategy. We cooperate from the SERG in Bremen with SRG and SWEA to learn more about the reforms ongoing in Sudan and to support the process of change in the country. It is intended to cooperate on the new Yearbook project of the Research Group on African Development Perspectives Bremen (see the International Call for Papers Volume 23).

    

 
The Sudanese Women Economists Association (SWEA) is becoming an important partner for democratic development, inclusive growth, and economic change in Sudan.

Source: Website SWEA

 

About the Mandate of SWEA:

“The Sudanese Women Economists Association (SWEA) was founded in June 2020, on the ground of redeeming the prevalent gap of women economists participation in the policy and academic spheres in Sudan. Fuelled by the enthusiasm of its founders and members, SWEA aims at building capacities, encouraging and amplifying the contribution of women economists, and of young women pursuing degrees in economics. SWEA strives to achieve this by providing a platform to convene Sudanese women economists, offering networking opportunities and enriching the economic research space by the contributions from its members.”

The Vision of SWEA:

“SWEA’s vision is to advance Sudanese women economists’ participation in academic and public policy spheres in Sudan. Our aim is to promote solidarity between Sudanese women economists across generations, as a key step to build capacity of young women in economics and to amplify the voices of Sudanese women in economic research and practice.”

Contact:
The website of SWEA is: https://sweasd.org.

 Source: Website SWEA

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31.01.2021
New Publications on Sudan’s Regional Development: Food Security and Agricultural Development in Kassala State, Sudan

Professor Samia Nour from the University of Khartoum, Sudan has published (in cooperation with Dr. Eltayeb Mohamedain) a working paper and two policy briefs on Food Security and Agricultural Development in Kassala State, Sudan. These are publications of the CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute). The CMI Sudan Working paper Number 1 (21 July 2020) and the two CMI Policy Briefs (21 July 2020) are of interest as the focus is on research done by regional universities and for advice to policymakers in peripheral regions in Sudan. The two policy briefs are based on the findings in the CMI Sudan working paper number 1 (21 July 2020) that analyses agricultural development and food security with the use of survey data from Kassala State. This research is conducted as part of the Agriculture and Food Security cluster in the Assisting Regional Universities in Sudan (ARUS) programme. The ARUS programme is a collaboration between CMI, the University of Khartoum, Ahfad University for Women, the University of Bergen, and several regional universities in Sudan. The programme is funded by the Norwegian Embassy in Khartoum. The importance of these studies is that regional universities in Sudan are participating, and that key issues of peripheral areas like food security and agricultural development are more deeply researched.

Professor Samia Nour is now also Book Reviews/Book Notes Editor of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook. She has advised the editors of volumes 20 (2018) and 21 (2019) and is Unit editor and Volume Editor for volume 22 (2020/21). She is also collaborating with various international research organisations. She has recently published in the SERG discussion papers of IWIM on Sudan’s revolution (see Number 44 of the SERG discussion papers with the title: “Overview of the Sudan Uprising”: http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/sudan_economy_research_group/).

Access to these three CMI publications (see links below) which are co-authored by Professor Samia Nour:

CMI Sudan Working Paper Number 1: “Food Security and Agricultural Development in Sudan: The case of Kassala State”, CMI Sudan Working Paper Number 1, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway, 21 July 2020, pp. 1-113. Link: Food Security and Agricultural Development in Sudan: The case of Kassala State

See the Abstract (shortened) below.

Sudan CMI Policy Brief Number 3: “Food Insecurity in Sudan as seen from Kassala State ”, Sudan CMI Policy Brief Number 3, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway, 21 July 2020, pp. 1-4. Link: Food Insecurity in Sudan as seen from Kassala State

“This policy brief discusses the incidence of food insecurity, explores families’ survival strategies, and recommends measures that may combat food insecurity.”

Sudan CMI Policy Brief 4: “Agricultural development and food Security in Sudan as seen from Kassala State”, Sudan CMI Policy Brief Number 4, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway, 21 July 2020, pp. 1-4. Link: Agricultural development and food Security in Sudan as seen from Kassala State

“This policy brief uses data from Kassala State to assess the close link between agricultural development and food security, and investigates factors and policies that can strengthen agricultural development, thereby increasing food security in Sudan.”

Abstract (shortened) of Sudan Working Paper 1, 21 July 2020

Food Security and Agricultural Development in Sudan: The case of Kassala State,

by Prof. Dr. Samia Mohamed Nour and Dr. Eltayeb Mohamedain, Bergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (Sudan Working Paper 2020:1)

This research discusses the relationship between agricultural development and food security, the determinants of the supply of food and of the demand for food, and the determinants of food insecurity in Kassala State. In so doing, it provides a significant contribution to the current literature. Used are new primary data from a Food Security Household Survey which was conducted in Kassala State (2019). It was found that the majority of households are food insecure (77%), out of which 32.9% of the households are severely food insecure, while fewer households are fully food secure (23%). There is a large variation in households' food insecurity between localities, with rural Kassala having most of the food insecure households. This may be explained by the variation in monthly income between localities.

Three hypotheses are examined. A first hypothesis is verified that the most significant determinants of production of food are the size of agricultural land, the available livestock, and the irrigation systems. There is support for the second hypothesis that the family's own production of food and the household income have positive effects on food consumption. It is found that the significant determinants of the production of sorghum (the main staple food) are the size of agricultural land and the available livestock, and that the significant determinants of consumption of sorghum are the family's own production of sorghum, the household income, and the family size. For small farmers, their own consumption of sorghum is to a larger extent determined by their own production of sorghum. Therefore, enhancing production of sorghum among smallholders would contribute to enhancing consumption of sorghum and hence supporting food security. The third hypothesis is verified that better working conditions of the farmers are crucial for family own production of food and are then supporting food security; the probabilities of households being food secure increase with better working conditions for higher family own production .

Investigating the gender gap related to food production and food security has led to the results that male-headed households produce more food and are more food secure than female-headed households. Some reasons for this observation are analyzed. Also, it was found out that agricultural production is impeded by the lack of agricultural land, the cultivation of only few crops, an insufficient irrigation system, and shortages of agricultural services, which are mainly related to the provision of agricultural technology. Therefore, the major policy implication is that measures aimed at increasing household incomes and enhancing family own production of food are important for eliminating food insecurity. Recommended are therefore policies that may increase household incomes and may enhance smallholders' own production of food. Relevant policy instruments may be increases of agricultural land ownership, increases of the size of cultivated land for smallholders, more diversification of agricultural food crops, an improvement of irrigation systems, measures for enhancing female participation in agricultural activities and food security, steps towards improvement of agricultural services, mainly related to the adoption of technology, improving access to clean drinking water and proper sanitation systems, and, in general terms, improved infrastructure which may help in access to food, to inputs, and to production requirements.

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06.06.2019
Sudan Expert Consultation on Development, Conflict and Peace at the Foreign Office in Berlin - Professor Karl Wohlmuth speaks about “International and regional economics and politics impacting on conflict and stability in the Sudan”

To prepare for the impacts of the escalating political and economic crisis in Sudan, the Foreign Office in Berlin has invited key international researchers on Sudan, representatives from German and UK ministries, representatives from thinktanks, and representatives from international NGOs to discuss under Chatham House rules about ways to address the Current Dynamics in Sudan, the Future of the International and Regional Interventions in Darfur, and the Regional Dynamics of Sudan. Professor Karl Wohlmuth gave a presentation on Sudan’s economic problems and perspectives, highlighting the internal economic problems and the cross-border issues which are affecting the development of the country (see the Presentation on Sudan by Karl Wohlmuth). Main emphasis in the presentation was on the need to revise the national economic policy of Sudan towards stability, innovation and diversification and towards a more balanced and mutually beneficial cooperation with the seven neighbouring countries, especially so the South Sudan

Professor Wohlmuth referred to the challenges and opportunities of economic and political cooperation programmes of Sudan with South Sudan which would yield high returns for the people and the economy of both countries – because of the high interdependence of the countries on oil production and oil transport issues, the economic role of the states (provinces) along the international border of Sudan and South Sudan, and the necessity to end conflicts in Sudan and in South Sudan through negotiated peace and development programmes. The end of the regime of Omar al-Bashir in Sudan may now provide a window of opportunity to start a “development-friendly” cooperation between the governments in Khartoum and Juba, and to build an alliance for peace and development along the international border between regions in Sudan and South Sudan.

Professor Karl Wohlmuth also presented his blueprint for an economic reform programme for Sudan and South Sudan as based on publications in the SERG Discussion Papers (see the links: https://www.karl-wohlmuth.de/serg_sudan_discussion_papers/ and http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/publikationen/pub-sudan.htm). Recently, Volume 20 (for 2018) of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook has brought interesting articles towards a strategy on Sudan’s science, technology and innovation (STI) policies, and on Sudan’s industry and agriculture policies. This part of the Yearbook on Sudan (Unit 2) builds a frame for a strategic reorientation of the Sudanese economy towards structural transformation, economic revitalization and diversification (see on this volume the links: http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/africa/africanyearbook.htm, and: https://www.karl-wohlmuth.de/african_development_perspectives_yearbook/, and: http://www.lit-verlag.de/reihe/adpy).

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26.10.2018
African Development Perspectives Yearbook: Volume 20 on “Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Policies For Inclusive Growth In Africa – General Issues And Country Cases” just published


In volume 20 of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook with the title “Science, Technology and Innovation Policies for Inclusive Growth in Africa - General Issues and Country Cases” major strategic and policy issues are analysed. The guiding issue is how to make Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Policies relevant for inclusive growth strategies in Africa so that socio-economic transformation strategies will take off. Although STI polices are considered as indispensable for sustainable growth in Africa, the steps towards such policies and strategies are not yet streamlined enough. Therefore, it is necessary to learn from the successful cases of STI development in Africa and in other emerging countries.


African Development Perspectives Yearbook 2018:
On Science, Technology And Innovation Policies For Inclusive Growth In Africa

In this volume a new approach is envisaged. Based on Africa’s deep-routed structural problems, the STI policies are related to Africa’s economic transformation agenda. In a first part of Volume 20 the general issues of introducing effective STI policies are presented, based on visions, strategic plans and the requirements of functioning national innovation systems. In a second part, country case studies highlight the new approach. Specific case studies, such as for Sudan and Nigeria, are presented, as these two countries have a long history of STI development. Strategies and policies for more coherent STI policies are presented (see the Cover of volume 20: PDF 91042-4 Alabi).

Complementary to this volume is Volume 21 with the title “Science, Technology and Innovation Policies for Inclusive Growth in Africa - Human Skills Development and Country Cases”. In the first part of Volume 21 the role of human skills development for capacity building in STI systems is discussed. This is based on examples from Cameroon, Nigeria and Mauritania. In the second part the national innovation systems and STI policies of North African countries (Egypt and Tunisia) are evaluated, to assess how they can be directed towards economic transformation and inclusive growth.

With Volume 21 the African Development Perspectives Yearbook project is approaching 30 years of activity as the first volume was published in 1989 under the title “Human Dimensions of Adjustment”. In these 30 years the African Development Perspectives Yearbook has become the major annual publication in English language on Africa in Germany. Guiding principle is the inclusion of authors and editors from Africa, the publication of essays which are also readable by media people, development actors and policymakers, and the presentation of successful policies, projects and programmes which highlight that Africa can succeed in regard of its ambitions and that it can rise in growth and development.

The Research Group on African Development Perspectives has just released the International Call for Papers for Volume 22 (2020) and invites Abstracts and nominations for the position of Guest Editors (see International Call for Papers Volume 22, for the year 2020).

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26.10.2018
SUDAN ECONOMY RESEARCH GROUP (SERG) DISCUSSION PAPERS Number 43: A Vision and a Strategy for Sudan

A new research and strategy paper on “Sudan in the 21st Century: Seeking Pathways Forward” was published as the number 43 in the SUDAN ECONOMY RESEARCH GROUP (SERG) DISCUSSION PAPERS series at the University of Bremen (see the link to the SERG series: http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/publikationen/pub-sudan.htm). Author is  Dr. Mohamed al Murtada Mustafa, Former Undersecretary of Labour, Ministry of Labour, Sudan and Former Director of ILO Offices in Harare and Cairo. The paper argues that for a successful reconstruction of the Sudanese economy five pillars are needed: education, entrepreneurship, agriculture, industry and management. These five pillars represent the main sectors and functional areas which must interact for inclusive growth to occur. Interaction depends on institutional reform and on a developmental role of the civil service. The separation of South Sudan in 2011 has fundamentally changed the situation of Sudan, and it is no longer possible to pursue uncoordinated, short-term and small-scale policy changes. Much more is needed – long-term structural strategies and deep policy changes must be implemented in Sudan. Fundamental reforms are proposed in the study and policy recommendations are presented for these five pillars.


Source: Dr. Mohamed al Murtada Mustafa, Khartoum, Sudan
The Strategic Pillars for Sudan’s Development

The author emphasizes also the fact that the Sudanese government has seen a great number of advisory and consultancy reports on economic strategies since 1956 when the country became independent. All these proposals and suggestions from donors, think tanks and international organisations were well-minded and valuable but were repetitive in content and never were implemented (neither by democratic governments nor by military regimes). Therefore, a new approach is needed by focussing on a developmental civil service and a new leadership for the country which is based on a broader group of policy actors – coming from all regions of the Sudan, from representative political circles and from significant parts of the civil society.  Such an approach is formulated in the new SERG study. Professor Karl Wohlmuth from the University of Bremen has peer-reviewed and re-edited the paper by Dr. Murtada. It will also be circulated in Arabic language by the author.

The new volume of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook – number 20 for the year 2018 – has also a strong strategic focus on Sudan; emphasis is on the strengthening of the National Innovation System (NIS) and the Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Policies of Sudan (issue one), on developing new policies to support innovative industrial enterprises (issue two), on attracting foreign enterprises and stimulating the technology transfer to domestic firms (issue three), and on increasing the yield in agriculture through R&D and appropriate dissemination of research results to the farming sector (issue four). Over the years the African Development Perspectives Yearbook has published regularly on Sudan and South Sudan and so has participated actively to the discussion on new development strategies for these countries (see the link to the Yearbook editions: http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/africa/africanyearbook.htm). The research on Sudan by the SERG is summarized in the report on Sudan Studies in Bremen (see the link to number 38 on “Sudan Studies in Bremen 1979-2011”: http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/publikationen/pub-sudan.htm). Most of the papers published by  the SERG have a focus on strategies and policies to advance structural change in Sudan (and in South Sudan).

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12.02.2018
Sudan: From an oil-based economy to an agriculture-based and science-based economy?

Prominent Sudanese scientists from universities and research institutions in Sudan and at UNESCO Cairo and Professor Karl Wohlmuth from the University of Bremen are launching a new strategy for a transition of Sudan from an oil-based development path towards an agriculture-based and science-based development model. This is a part (Unit 2) of the forthcoming Volume 20 of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook on “Science, Technology and Innovation Policies for Inclusive Growth in Africa. General Issues and Country Cases”. Professor Dr. Samia Satti Osman Mohamed Nour and Professor Karl Wohlmuth contributed an Introductory Essay to the theme under the title: “Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Policies for Sudan’s Economic Revitalization - An Introduction”. The Unit 2 in Volume 20 of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook with the title: “Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Policies for Sudan’s Economic Revitalization”  has four additional essays. Professor Samia Satti Nour presents an analysis of the national innovation system (NIS) of Sudan, by focusing on three subsystems, the education institutions subsystem, the science & technology institutions subsystem, and the ICT institutions subsystem; the weaknesses of the NIS are highlighted and an agenda for action is proposed. She also presents in a second essay an analysis about innovative industrial firms in Sudan, focussing on two internationally active Sudanese conglomerates in the food industry, on two large-sized companies (belonging to the chemical and food industries) and on two medium-sized companies (belonging to the metal and textile industries). The purpose is to assess how innovative these companies really are and how they could improve their innovation performance. It is also measured by a new analytical approach how far away these companies are from the innovation frontier, and it is analysed what the government and the private sector can do to stimulate STI in the Sudanese companies.

Migdam E. Abdelgani, from the National Centre for Research (NCR), Environment, Natural Resources and Desertification Research Institute (ENDRI), and Nazar Mohamed Hassan, from the UNESCO Cairo Office, provide an essay on the impact of agricultural research on the agriculture yields in Sudan. ENDRI has recently launched the Environment and Natural Resources International Journal (ENRIJ), with volume 1 and number 1 published in 2016 (link: http://www.sudanknowledge.org/journals/enrij/); ENDRI is a key research institution in Sudan. This essay is analysing the factors which are impeding yield increases in Sudan, but this essay is also using the example of the national crops campaigns in Egypt (such as for rice production increases) as a model of large-scale testing of agricultural research results in the field.

Finally, the Unit 2 on Sudan in Volume 20 presents an analysis by Mohammed Elhaj Mustafa Ali from the University of Kassala and the Sudan International University (SIU) about knowledge spillovers from foreign investors in Sudan to local companies. Although the oil-based growth in Sudan has attracted mainly investment for the oil sector, foreign investment was also incoming to supply the growing Sudanese consumption market and to invest in agriculture and services sectors of Sudan. The essay on knowledge spillovers from foreign direct investors to domestic firms in Sudan gives also an agenda of how to stimulate technology transfers from foreign firms to domestic firms.

In the Introductory Essay by Professor Samia Satti Nour and by Professor Karl Wohlmuth also an Agenda for Reforms aimed at Economic Revitalization through STI Development is presented. The Strategy proposed has short-term to medium-term to long-term implications for reforming institutions and policies. Professor Samia Satti Nour is a prominent researcher on STI development. She recently has obtained a full professorship at Khartoum University (see the PDFs of the Inaugural Lecture/ICT Development in Sudan and the Inaugural Lecture/Academic Profile of and Awards to Professor Samia Satti Nour, as well as the PDF on the Abstract in English and in Arabic of her Springer Book ICT in Sudan). Professor Wohlmuth was invited to attend the inaugural meeting at the University of Khartoum. Professor Samia Satti Nour is adviser to the African Development Perspectives Yearbook programme for Volume 20 and Co-editor of Volume 20. Recently she has presented a Policy Note on the multiple Digital Divides in Africa for The Nordic Africa Institute (see the PDF: NAI Policy Note).

Dr. Hassan Mohamed Nazar is also Co-editor of the Volume 20 of the African Development Perspectives Yearbook. He is Senior Science and Technology Specialist for the Arab States in UNESCO’s Cairo Office since 2009. He has massively contributed to the Introductory Unit 1 for Volume 20 (together with Professor Karl Wohlmuth), and he has participated as a speaker at the Launch Event for volumes 18 and 19 of the Yearbook in Kigali, Rwanda in October 2016 at the invitation of UNECA. In the Unit 2 on Sudan for Volume 20 he contributed with an essay on the role of agricultural research for increasing agricultural yields in Sudan, an essay which was written in cooperation with Migdam E. Abdelgani.  Dr. Hassan Mohamed Nazar has also established the Sudan Knowledge (SK) Platform  to make the intellectual capacities of the Sudanese researchers and other experts and policymakers known more widely and to allow for a broader use of these capacities for development. The SK Platform is a strong network of researchers, policy makers, educators, consultants and employers from all parts of the world to exchange knowledge and experience and to discuss current developments and challenges. This Directory of Capacities of the Sudanese can be used to help find, support and collaborate with experts from the SK network. The Sudan Knowledge Network aims also to bring together researchers and experts from the Diaspora (see the various links: http://www.sudanknowledge.org/network/name/nazar-hassan/, and: http://www.sudanknowledge.org/network/locality/Cairo/, and: http://www.sudanknowledge.org/network/country/Egypt/).

Migdam E. Abdelgani, from the National Centre for Research (NCR), is known for his study (in cooperation with other Sudanese researchers) about “Potential Production and Application of Biofertilizers in Sudan”, published in the Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 9 (9), pp. 926-934, 2010 (link: www.sustech.edu/staff_publications/20100822070957958.pdf). These ideas are relevant for an agricultural transformation strategy which is part of the economic revitalization programme for Sudan.

Dr. Mohamed Elhaj Mustafa Ali, as the author on the essay about knowledge spillovers from foreign investors to domestic firms in Sudan, is lecturer at the University of Kassala and at the Sudan International University (link: http://www.siu-sd.com/). He is expert on foreign direct investment in Sudan and has recently published a Policy Brief on the relevant issues of foreign investment in Sudan in Bremen at the SERG/IWIM platforms (see the PDF: Mustafa Ali -Policy Brief). He has also published a Policy Brief for the Economic Research Forum (ERF) in Cairo on “Measures to Protect Poor Sudanese Households from the Risks of Catastrophic Health Expenditures” (see the PDF: PB28-Mustafa Ali).

There are intentions to continue to cooperate in the future on the most important issues of STI development for Sudan. The Sudan Economy Research Group (SERG) Discussion Paper Series is still open for researchers from Sudan to publish on these most important issues (see the links to the series: https://www.karl-wohlmuth.de/serg_sudan_discussion_papers/, and: http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/publikationen/pub-sudan.htm).

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